#Shorts Original news: https://www.foxnews.com/lifestyle/10-tips-manage-stress-mental-health-experts We all want to be a better, less stressed version of ourselves in the new year. Actually accomplishing that? No easy task, especially amid an ongoing pandemic. Thankfully, there’s a slate of expert- and research-backed tips you can follow to channel a calmer, happier you in the new year. Fox News spoke to mental health experts for their secrets to help you glide into that saner state of mind. This is a savvy strategy shared by Dr. Sabrina Romanoff, clinical psychologist and professor at Yeshiva University in New York City, from a branch of therapy called Dialectical Behavior Therapy, or DBT. “Stop stands for: Stop; Take a step back; Observe; Proceed mindfully,” she explains. “When emotions take over, you may find that you act impulsively. When you react impulsively, you do not have time to use your arsenal of skills.” When you find yourself on edge about something or feel yourself panicking, use “STOP” to regain control of the situation. Another M.O. from DBT, Romanoff breaks “TIP” down: “Tipping the temperature of your face with cold water; Intense aerobic exercise; Paced breathing, and Paired muscle relaxation,” she says, noting that each of these techniques has the effect of quickly changing your biological response pattern to stress. “In turn, they lead to a decline in your emotional arousal. These skills work like fast-acting medications.” By grounding yourself in the present moment, you’ll be able to cope better with whatever’s at hand. It may be cold out, but getting outside is still important for your mental health. (iStock) For a modified version of “TIP,” just try putting your face in cold water, and you may be surprised at how the experience resets your mental outlook. “Bend over, hold your breath, and immerse your face in a bowl of cold water for up to 60 seconds,” offers Romanoff. “This is usually sufficient to induce the ‘dive reflex.’ The colder the water and the longer the immersion, the better it works.” As Romanoff further explains, the dive reflex is when our hearts tend to slow down below resting heart rate when submerged in cold water without oxygen, due to increased activation of the parasympathetic nervous system, which decreases arousal. You may find taking an icy cold shower resets your mood, too. It may be cold out, but getting outside is still important for your mental health. “Having fewer hours of daylight can have a negative impact on your mood,” Doreen Marshall, vice president of mission engagement at the American Foundation for Suicide Prevention (AFSP) states. To help cope with less sunlight, she recommends finding 30 minutes to get outside. “You can simply sit and watch the sunrise or walk around your neighborhood Whatever you do, just make an effort to make it a daily habit,” she says. If you’re physically able, don’t worry about running or jogging to reap the health benefits of getting outdoors — a walk will do the trick. “Many people think that you have to do vigorous exercise to get benefits, but research, including in my lab, has found that you really don’t,” echoes Thomas Plante, a psychology professor at Santa Clara University and adjunct clinical professor of psychiatry at Stanford University Medical School. “Stress reduction can be found by taking brief walks. Try to take a walk each day, even if it is only for 15 minutes, and you’ll be less stressed over time.” The pandemic has completely upended the way we socialize, and millions of Americans are grappling with feelings of isolation. “Chances are pretty good that you are not alone in feeling lonely, and sharing how you are feeling may empower others to do the same,” says Marshall. “Reach out to someone who may also be feeling that way and talk about ways you can stay connected and support each other.” The pandemic has completely upended the way we socialize, and millions of Americans are grappling with feelings of isolation….

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